Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 121402, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/121402
Review Article

A Novel Mechanism for Cross-Adaptation between Heat and Altitude Acclimation: The Role of Heat Shock Protein 90

Department of Health, Exercise and Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA

Received 28 October 2013; Revised 4 April 2014; Accepted 9 April 2014; Published 12 May 2014

Academic Editor: Hanjoong Jo

Copyright © 2014 Roy M. Salgado et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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