Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 545967, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/545967
Research Article

Physiological Responses to Nutrient Accumulation in Trees Seedlings Irrigated with Municipal Effluent in Indian Desert

1Division of Forest Ecology, Arid Forest Research Institute, New Pali Road, Jodhpur 342005, India
2Division of Forest Genetics and Tree Breeding, Arid Forest Research Institute, New Pali Road, Jodhpur 342005, India

Received 5 February 2014; Revised 25 June 2014; Accepted 2 July 2014; Published 24 July 2014

Academic Editor: Deyue Yu

Copyright © 2014 G. Singh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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