Table of Contents
Physiology Journal
Volume 2014, Article ID 673530, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/673530
Clinical Study

Daily Controlled Consumption of an Electrokinetically Modified Water Alters the Fatigue Response as a Result of Strenuous Resistance Exercise

1Department of Applied Physiology & Kinesiology, Center for Exercise Science, University of Florida, 100 FLG, P.O. Box 118205, 1864 Stadium Road, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2Department of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 12 February 2014; Revised 11 April 2014; Accepted 25 April 2014; Published 7 May 2014

Academic Editor: Michael Koutsilieris

Copyright © 2014 Paul A. Borsa and Kelly A. Larkin-Kaiser. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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