Figure 7: Internal structure of the nuclides of hydrogen, as proposed by the Cordus theory. In Figure (b) we have the following. (1) Simple pair: this comprises one proton and one neutron, making 1H1. (2) All these are cisphasic joints and hence stability. (3) The neutron joins with the proton in a cisphasic relationship. Doing so gives stability advantages to the proton and neutron. The similar but nonidentical masses of the particules mean that there is a small degree of strain in the assembly. In Figure (c) we have the following. (1) This is the preferred design. (2) An alternative design. (3) Second neutron is also in a cisphasic relationship with the proton and first neutron. This is a type of bridge structure. The instability arises from the lack of orthogonality, that is, strain. (4) Primary neutron is in a cisphasic relationship with the proton. (5) proton. (6) neutron. In Figure (d) we have the following. (1) Lamellar plate, in condensed representation. (2) This subassembly is one of the permitted types. However, being the smallest of the subassemblies, the strain per joint is high. Hence, it has poor stability (except when balanced with 2 protons and 2 neutrons). (3) Lamellar plate. In Figure (e) we have the following. (1) Preferred design. (2) An alternative design. In Figure (f) we have the following. (1) The polymer wraps itself around the edges of a cube. (2) These are the only cisphasic joints in the assembly. (3) All the neutron-neutron joints are transphasic (n × n). in Figure (g) we have the following. (1) No more neutrons can be fitted into a single cube, but a proton bridge structure is available. (2) An alternative design.