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Pathology Research International
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 364069, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2011/364069
Review Article

Genetic Polymorphism of Cancer Susceptibility Genes and HPV Infection in Cervical Carcinogenesis

1Department of Medical Technology, Kobe Tokiwa University, 6-2 2 chome, Ohtanicho, Nagataku, Hyogo, Kobe 653-0838, Japan
2Department of Cytopathology and Gynecology, Osaka Cancer Prevention and Detection Center, Osaka 536-8588, Japan
3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Japanese Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Kyoto 605-0981, Japan

Received 8 January 2011; Accepted 3 March 2011

Academic Editor: Kiyomi Taniyama

Copyright © 2011 Osamu Nunobiki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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