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Pathology Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 782395, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/782395
Review Article

A Compendium of Urinary Biomarkers Indicative of Glomerular Podocytopathy

1Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, 420 Delaware Street SE, MMC 609 Mayo D185, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
2Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 149 13th Street, Boston, MA 02129, USA
3University of Belgrade School of Medicine, Dr. Subotica 8, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia

Received 22 July 2013; Accepted 10 September 2013

Academic Editor: Piero Tosi

Copyright © 2013 Miroslav Sekulic and Simona Pichler Sekulic. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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