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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2010, Article ID 949027, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/949027
Research Article

Relationships between Irritable Bowel Syndrome Pain, Skin Temperature Indices of Autonomic Dysregulation, and Sensitivity to Thermal Cutaneous Stimulation

1Department of Prosthodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, D11-006 Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
2Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111, USA
3Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, 1600 SW Archer Rd, D11-006 Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
4Community Health & Family Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
5Department of Neuroscience, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA

Received 17 February 2010; Accepted 3 June 2010

Academic Editor: Donald A. Simone

Copyright © 2010 Fong Wong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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