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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2011, Article ID 738645, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/738645
Research Article

Synaptic Conversion of Chloride-Dependent Synapses in Spinal Nociceptive Circuits: Roles in Neuropathic Pain

Department of Biology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1800, USA

Received 25 December 2010; Accepted 21 March 2011

Academic Editor: Fani L. Neto

Copyright © 2011 Mark S. Cooper and Adam S. Przebinda. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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