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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 964652, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/964652
Review Article

Astroglial Integrins in the Development and Regulation of Neurovascular Units

1Department of Anesthesiology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, 1-3-3 Nakamichi, Higashinari-ku, Osaka 537-8511, Japan
2Department of Molecular Pathobiology and Cell Adhesion Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Mie University, 2-174 Edobashi, Mie, Tsu City, Japan

Received 8 May 2012; Accepted 13 November 2012

Academic Editor: Kazuhide Inoue

Copyright © 2012 Hironobu Tanigami et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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