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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 675915, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/675915
Research Article

The Beliefs of Third-Level Healthcare Students towards Low-Back Pain

Department of Clinical Therapies, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland

Received 21 January 2014; Accepted 24 March 2014; Published 10 April 2014

Academic Editor: Giustino Varrassi

Copyright © 2014 Norelee Kennedy et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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