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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 263904, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/263904
Research Article

The Association between Patient-Reported Pain and Doctors’ Language Proficiency in Clinical Practice

1Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, Kiskontie 23 B, 00280 Helsinki, Finland
2Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Helsinki, PB 20 (Tukholmankatu 8 B), 00014 Helsinki, Finland

Received 22 June 2015; Accepted 6 September 2015

Academic Editor: Anna Maria Aloisi

Copyright © 2015 Marianne Mustajoki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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