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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2015, Article ID 292805, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/292805
Review Article

The Role of Descending Modulation in Manual Therapy and Its Analgesic Implications: A Narrative Review

1Kinesiology Program, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA
2College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA

Received 3 July 2015; Revised 15 November 2015; Accepted 29 November 2015

Academic Editor: Bjorn Meyerson

Copyright © 2015 Andrew D. Vigotsky and Ryan P. Bruhns. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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