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Pain Research and Treatment
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3797493, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3797493
Research Article

Risk Factors Linked to Psychological Distress, Productivity Losses, and Sick Leave in Low-Back-Pain Employees: A Three-Year Longitudinal Cohort Study

1Department of Human and Social Sciences, University of Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy
2Human Factors and Technologies in Healthcare Research Centre, University of Bergamo, Bergamo, Italy
3Pain Medicine Centre, Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan, Italy
4Pain Medicine Centre, Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy
5University of Applied Science of Southern Switzerland, Pain Pathophysiology and Therapy Programme, Manno, Switzerland

Received 13 May 2016; Revised 2 July 2016; Accepted 28 July 2016

Academic Editor: Karel Allegaert

Copyright © 2016 Angelo Compare et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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