Pain Research and Treatment

Pain Research and Treatment / 2016 / Article

Comment on “Cost-Saving Early Diagnosis of Functional Pain in Nonmalignant Pain: A Noninferiority Study of Diagnostic Accuracy”

  • Katsuhiro Toda |
  •  Article ID 8542491 |
  •  Published 14 Sep 2016

Response to: Comment on “Cost-Saving Early Diagnosis of Functional Pain in Nonmalignant Pain: A Noninferiority Study of Diagnostic Accuracy”

  • N. Egloff | R. J. Cámara | ... | R. von Känel |
  •  Article ID 4657102 |
  •  Published 29 Nov 2016
  • | View Article

Letter to the Editor | Open Access

Volume 2016 |Article ID 8542491 | https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/8542491

Katsuhiro Toda, "Comment on “Cost-Saving Early Diagnosis of Functional Pain in Nonmalignant Pain: A Noninferiority Study of Diagnostic Accuracy”", Pain Research and Treatment, vol. 2016, Article ID 8542491, 1 page, 2016. https://doi.org/10.1155/2016/8542491

Comment on “Cost-Saving Early Diagnosis of Functional Pain in Nonmalignant Pain: A Noninferiority Study of Diagnostic Accuracy”

Academic Editor: Donald A. Simone
Received30 May 2016
Accepted16 Aug 2016
Published14 Sep 2016

Dr. Cámara et al. published a diagnostic testing that distinguishes functional pain from neuropathic and nociceptive pain [1]. It is very important to distinguish between neuropathic pain and nociceptive pain, because treatment of the two kinds of pain is completely different. However, distinction between neuropathic pain and functional pain provides little clinical value, because treatment of the two kinds of pain is almost the same. Functional pain corresponds to central sensitivity syndromes such as fibromyalgia (FM) and its incomplete forms. To my knowledge, if FM is neuropathic pain, FM is the disorder that has the highest number of science-based treatments among neuropathic pain. Effective treatment for FM is effective for other neuropathic pain. From the viewpoint of treatment, we do not have to distinguish neuropathic pain from functional pain. Continuance of any kinds of pain causes central sensitization in the brain and/or spinal cord, and central sensitization itself causes pain. I believe that pain due to central sensitization is central neuropathic pain and functional pain is central neuropathic pain. FM has a feature of central neuropathic pain. I believe that we do not have to distinguish neuropathic pain from functional pain.

Competing Interests

The author declares that they have no competing interests.

References

  1. R. J. Cámara, C. Merz, B. Wegmann, S. Stauber, R. von Känel, and N. Egloff, “Cost-saving early diagnosis of functional pain in nonmalignant pain: a noninferiority study of diagnostic accuracy,” Pain Research and Treatment, vol. 2016, Article ID 5964250, 7 pages, 2016. View at: Publisher Site | Google Scholar

Copyright © 2016 Katsuhiro Toda. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


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