Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Sarcoma
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3761292, 6 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3761292
Clinical Study

Neoadjuvant Ifosfamide and Epirubicin in the Treatment of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors

1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
2Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
3Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
4Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8118, 660 South Euclid Ave., St. Louis, MO 63110, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Angela C. Hirbe

Received 16 February 2017; Accepted 13 April 2017; Published 4 May 2017

Academic Editor: Alessandro Gronchi

Copyright © 2017 Angela C. Hirbe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background and Objectives. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are aggressive soft tissue sarcomas with poor overall survival. Response to chemotherapy has been debated for these tumors. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis of the patients at our institution with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of MPNST that underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to surgery. Results. We retrospectively identified five patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin and ifosfamide that demonstrated a 30% reduction in tumor growth and a 60% response rate by RECIST criteria. Additionally, a metabolic response was observed in all three patients who received serial PET scans during neoadjuvant treatment. The clinical benefit rate, which includes stable disease, was 100%. Conclusions. Our data suggest that MPNSTs do respond to epirubicin and ifosfamide based chemotherapy and prospective studies are warranted to further define the clinical benefit.