Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Sarcoma
Volume 2018, Article ID 3143096, 12 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3143096
Research Article

Aerosol Gemcitabine after Amputation Inhibits Osteosarcoma Lung Metastases but Not Wound Healing

1The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Pediatrics, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 0853, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Stem Cell Transplantation Research, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Nightlight Urgent Care, 15551 Southwest Freeway, Sugar Land, TX 77478, USA
4Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Children’s Cancer Hospital, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 1484, Houston, TX 77030, USA
5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of West Virginia, P.O. Box 9196, Morgantown, WV 26506-9196, USA
6The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Pharmacy Pharmacology Research, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Unit 0090, Houston, TX 77030, USA
7Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Eugenie S. Kleinerman; gro.nosrednadm@renielke

Received 17 August 2017; Accepted 25 October 2017; Published 21 January 2018

Academic Editor: Fritz C. Eilber

Copyright © 2018 Eugenie S. Kleinerman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. F. Eilber, A. Giuliano, J. Eckardt, K. Patterson, S. Moseley, and J. Goodnight, “Adjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma: a randomized prospective trial,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 21–26, 1987. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  2. N. Jaffe, “Historical perspective on the introduction and use of chemotherapy for the treatment of osteosarcoma,” Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 804, pp. 1–30, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. L. Mirabello, R. J. Troisi, and S. A. Savage, “Osteosarcoma incidence and survival rates from 1973 to 2004: data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program,” Cancer, vol. 115, no. 7, pp. 1531–1543, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. J. F. Huth and F. R. Eilber, “Patterns of recurrence after resection of osteosarcoma of the extremity. Strategies for treatment of metastases,” Archives of Surgery, vol. 124, no. 1, pp. 122–126, 1989. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. M. D. Tabone, “Osteosarcoma recurrences in pediatric patients previously treated with intensive chemotherapy,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 12, no. 12, pp. 2614–2620, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  6. M. A. Smith, N. L. Seibel, S. F. Altekruse et al., “Outcomes for children and adolescents with cancer: challenges for the twenty-first century,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 28, no. 15, pp. 2625–2634, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. P. Berlanga, A. Canete, R. Diaz et al., “Presentation and long-term outcome of high-grade osteosarcoma: a single-institution experience,” Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, vol. 37, no. 5, pp. e272–e277, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. H. Imran, F. Enders, M. Krailo et al., “Effect of time to resumption of chemotherapy after definitive surgery on prognosis for non-metastatic osteosarcoma,” Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-American Volume, vol. 91, no. 3, pp. 604–612, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. P. A. Meyers, G. Heller, J. Healey et al., “Chemotherapy for nonmetastatic osteogenic sarcoma: the Memorial Sloan-Kettering experience,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 5–15, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  10. C. N. Serhan and N. Chiang, “Novel endogenous small molecules as the checkpoint controllers in inflammation and resolution: entree for resoleomics,” Rheumatic Disease Clinics of North America, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 69–95, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. J. A. Schilling, “Wound healing,” Surgical Clinics of North America, vol. 56, no. 4, pp. 859–874, 1976. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  12. P. Bainbridge, “Wound healing and the role of fibroblasts,” Journal of Wound Care, vol. 22, no. 8, pp. 407-408, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. G. Broughton II, J. E. Janis, and C. E. Attinger, “Wound healing: an overview,” Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol. 117, no. 7, pp. 1e-S–32e-S, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. J. Hart, “Inflammation. 2: its role in the healing of chronic wounds,” Journal of Wound Care, vol. 11, no. 7, pp. 245–249, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  15. J. E. Park and A. Barbul, “Understanding the role of immune regulation in wound healing,” American Journal of Surgery, vol. 187, no. 5, pp. 11S–16S, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. S. Werner and R. Grose, “Regulation of wound healing by growth factors and cytokines,” Physiological Reviews, vol. 83, no. 3, pp. 835–870, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  17. A. J. Singer and R. A. Clark, “Cutaneous wound healing,” New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 341, no. 10, pp. 738–746, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. W. Plunkett, P. Huang, Y. Z. Xu, V. Heinemann, R. Grunewald, and V. Gandhi, “Gemcitabine: metabolism, mechanisms of action, and self-potentiation,” Seminars in Oncology, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 3–10, 1995. View at Google Scholar
  19. S. Okuno, J. Edmonson, M. Mahoney, J. C. Buckner, S. Frytak, and E. Galanis, “Phase II trial of gemcitabine in advanced sarcomas,” Cancer, vol. 94, no. 12, pp. 3225–3229, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. N. V. Koshkina, B. E. Gilbert, J. C. Waldrep, A. Seryshev, and V. Knight, “Distribution of camptothecin after delivery as a liposome aerosol or following intramuscular injection in mice,” Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 187–192, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. N. Gordon and E. S. Kleinerman, “Aerosol therapy for the treatment of osteosarcoma lung metastases: targeting the Fas/FasL pathway and rationale for the use of gemcitabine,” Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 189–196, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. N. V. Koshkina and E. S. Kleinerman, “Aerosol gemcitabine inhibits the growth of primary osteosarcoma and osteosarcoma lung metastases,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 116, no. 3, pp. 458–463, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. C. O. Rodriguez Jr., R. A. Crabbs, D. W. Wilson et al., “Aerosol gemcitabine: preclinical safety and in vivo antitumor activity in osteosarcoma-bearing dogs,” Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, vol. 23, no. 4, pp. 197–206, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. E. Lemarie, L. Vecellio, J. Hureaux et al., “Aerosolized gemcitibine in patients with carcinoma of the lung: feasibility and safety study,” Journal of Aerosol Medicine and Pulmonary Drug Delivery, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 261–270, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. N. Gordon, N. V. Koshkina, S.-F. Jia et al., “Corruption of the fas pathway delays the pulmonary clearance of murine osteosarcoma cells, enhances their metastatic potential, and reduces the effect of aerosol gemcitabine,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 13, no. 15, pp. 4503–4510, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. Y. Ishida, J. L. Gao, and P. M. Murphy, “Chemokine receptor CX3CR1 mediates skin wound healing by promoting macrophage and fibroblast accumulation and function,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 180, no. 1, pp. 569–579, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  27. H. Tomita, Y. Iwata, F. Ogawa et al., “P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 contributes to wound healing predominantly as a p-selectin ligand and partly as an e-selectin ligand,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 129, no. 8, pp. 2059–2067, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. T. Kimura, M. Sugaya, A. Blauvelt, H. Okochi, and S. Sato, “Delayed wound healing due to increased interleukin-10 expression in mice with lymphatic dysfunction,” Journal of Leukocyte Biology, vol. 94, no. 1, pp. 137–145, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. K. Holmes, O. L. Roberts, A. M. Thomas, and M. J. Corss, “Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2: structure, function, intracellular signalling and therapeutic inhibition,” Cellular Signalling, vol. 19, no. 10, pp. 2003–2012, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. D. L. Miller, S. Ortega, O. Bashayan, R. Basch, and C. Basilico, “Compensation by fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) does not account for the mild phenotypic defects observed in FGF2 null mice,” Molecular and Cellular Biology, vol. 20, no. 6, pp. 2260–2268, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. S. Ortega, M. Ittmann, S. H. Tsang, M. Ehrlich, and C. Basilico, “Neuronal defects and delayed wound healing in mice lacking fibroblast growth factor 2,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 95, no. 10, pp. 5672–5677, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. K. A. Skinner, F. R. Eilber, E. C. Holmes, J. Eckardt, and G. Rosen, “Surgical treatment and chemotherapy for pulmonary metastases from osteosarcoma,” Archives of Surgery, vol. 127, no. 9, pp. 1065–1070, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. M. E. Swift, E. S. Kleinman, and L. A. DiPietro, “Impaired wound repair and delayed angiogenesis in aged mice,” Laboratory Investigation, vol. 79, no. 12, pp. 1479–1487, 1999. View at Google Scholar
  34. J. P. Lagmay, M. D. Krailo, H. Dang et al., “Outcome of patients with recurrent osteosarcoma enrolled in seven phase II trials through children’s cancer group, pediatric oncology group, and children’s oncology group: learning from the past to move forward,” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 34, no. 25, pp. 3031–3038, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. J. A. Livingston, K. R. Hess, A. Naing et al., “Validation of prognostic scoring and assessment of clinical benefit for patients with bone sarcomas enrolled in phase I clinical trials,” Oncotarget, vol. 7, no. 39, pp. 64421–64430, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. B. Kempf-Bielack, S. S. Bielack, H. Jurgens et al., “Osteosarcoma relapse after combined modality therapy: an analysis of unselected patients in the Cooperative Osteosarcoma Study Group (COSS),” Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 559–568, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. H. Zhang, Z. Huang, X. Zou, and T. Liu, “Bevacizumab and wound-healing complications: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials,” Oncotarget, vol. 7, no. 50, pp. 82473–82481, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Werner, M. Breeden, G. Hübner, D. G. Greenhalgh, and M. T. Longaker, “Induction of keratinocyte growth factor expression is reduced and delayed during wound healing in the genetically diabetic mouse,” Journal of Investigative Dermatology, vol. 103, no. 4, pp. 469–473, 1994. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar