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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 459284, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/459284
Review Article

Weight Gain, Schizophrenia and Antipsychotics: New Findings from Animal Model and Pharmacogenomic Studies

1Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, 250 College Street, Room 30, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 1R8
2Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Sezione di Psichiatria, Laboratorio di Psichiatria Molecolare, University of Napoli “Federico II”, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Napoli, Italy

Received 3 April 2010; Revised 3 August 2010; Accepted 24 October 2010

Academic Editor: Nakao Iwata

Copyright © 2011 Fabio Panariello et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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