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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 373261, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/373261
Research Article

Elevated Serum Levels of Homocysteine as an Early Prognostic Factor of Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents

1Department of Psychiatry and Narcology, Riga Stradins University, 215-27 Maskavas Street, 1019 Riga, Latvia
2Department of Internal Diseases, Riga Stradins University (RSU), 13 Pilsonu Street, 1002 Riga, Latvia
3Children’s Psychiatric Hospital BKUS “Gailezers”, 20 Juglas Street, 1079 Riga, Latvia
4Scientific Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Riga Stradins University, 16 Dzirciema Street, 1007 Riga, Latvia

Received 21 March 2012; Revised 27 July 2012; Accepted 13 August 2012

Academic Editor: David C. Henderson

Copyright © 2012 Laura Kevere et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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