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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 484502, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/484502
Review Article

Cognitive Control and Discourse Comprehension in Schizophrenia

1Department of Psychology and Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Imaging Research Center, and Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA

Received 16 November 2011; Accepted 17 January 2012

Academic Editor: Margaret A. Niznikiewicz

Copyright © 2012 Megan A. Boudewyn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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