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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 825050, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/825050
Clinical Study

High Order Linguistic Features Such as Ambiguity Processing as Relevant Diagnostic Markers for Schizophrenia

1ZADZ Zurich, Dufourstrasse 161, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland
2Research Group Clinical and Experimental Psychopathology, Department of Social and General Psychiatry, Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich, Lenggstraße 31, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland
3Department of Neurology, RWTH Aachen University, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany

Received 14 December 2011; Revised 16 April 2012; Accepted 16 November 2012

Academic Editor: Ruth Condray

Copyright © 2012 Daniel Ketteler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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