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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2014, Article ID 679810, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/679810
Research Article

Traditional Knowledge and Formulations of Medicinal Plants Used by the Traditional Medical Practitioners of Bangladesh to Treat Schizophrenia Like Psychosis

Ethnobotany & Ethnomedicine Division, TechB Herbal Solution, Bheramara, Kushtia 7040, Bangladesh

Received 19 March 2014; Revised 28 May 2014; Accepted 30 May 2014; Published 30 June 2014

Academic Editor: Jouko Miettunen

Copyright © 2014 Md. Nasir Ahmed and Md. Nur Kabidul Azam. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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