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Schizophrenia Research and Treatment
Volume 2016, Article ID 1942828, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1942828
Research Article

Neuroactive Steroids in First-Episode Psychosis: A Role for Progesterone?

1Department of Neurosciences, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genova, Genova, Italy
2Department of Psychological Medicine, King’s College London, London, UK
3Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Center for Applied Biomedical Research (CRBA), St. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
4Bologna Transcultural Psychosomatic Team (BoTPT), Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
5Section of Medical Genetics, Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
6Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Received 29 May 2016; Revised 4 August 2016; Accepted 17 August 2016

Academic Editor: Markus Jäger

Copyright © 2016 Martino Belvederi Murri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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