Table of Contents
Urban Studies Research
Volume 2017, Article ID 3073282, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3073282
Research Article

Determinants of Growth in Multiunit Housing Demand since the Great Recession: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis

1Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto, 33 Willcocks Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3B3
2School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, 357 Newins-Ziegler Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Shiv N. Mehrotra; moc.liamg@artorhem.vihs

Received 17 June 2017; Accepted 28 August 2017; Published 12 October 2017

Academic Editor: Thomas Panagopoulos

Copyright © 2017 Shiv N. Mehrotra and Douglas R. Carter. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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