Advances in Astronomy
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision37 days
Acceptance to publication63 days
CiteScore2.800
Impact Factor2.353

Light Speed Invariant Solution and Its Enlightenment of Field Equation of General Relativity

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Advances in Astronomy publishes in all areas of astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology, and accepts observational and theoretical investigations into celestial objects and the wider universe.

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Chief Editor, Professor Trigo-Rodríguez (ICE, IEEC-CSIC), has a background in the formation of primitive solar system minor bodies, the study of their fragments in space and the analysis of their surviving rocks that arrived on the Earth.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Wormhole Models and Energy Conditions in Gravity with the Hu–Sawicki Model

In this recent study, we shall investigate the wormhole models with a Hu–Sawicki model in the framework of gravity. Spherically static symmetric space-time is considered to construct wormhole models with the anisotropic fluid distribution. The traceless matter is discussed by imposing a particular equation of state. To address the important conditions of the shape function of the wormhole geometry, we have used the particular values of the involved parameters. Furthermore, different energy conditions are discussed to check the nature of matter against two specific models. The null energy condition is observed to be violated for both of the models. It is mentioned that our inquired results are acceptable.

Research Article

Isotropic Gravastar Model in Rastall Gravity

In the present paper, we have introduced a new model of gravastar with an isotropic matter distribution in Rastall gravity by the Mazur–Mottola (2004) mechanism. Mazur–Mottola approach is about the construction of gravastar which is predicted as an alternative to black hole. By following this convention, we define gravastar in the form of three phases. The first one is an interior phase which has negative density; the second part consists of thin shell comprising ultrarelativistic stiff fluid for which we have discussed the length, energy, and entropy. By the graphical analysis of entropy, we have shown that our proposed thin shell gravastar model is potentially stable. The third phase of gravastar is defined by the exterior Schwarzschild geometry. For the interior of gravastar, we have found the analytical solutions free from any singularity and the event horizon in the framework of Rastall gravity.

Research Article

Approximate Analytical Three-Dimensional Multiple Time Scales Solution to a Circular Restricted Three-Body Problem

We illustrate the chaotic nature of the circular restricted three-body problem from the perspective of the bifurcation diagram with respect to the mass ratio parameter. Moreover, it is shown that when the frequency ratio in different directions of the classical problem is irrational, it has the quasiperiodic characteristics. In addition, a three-dimensional approximate solution to this problem under two time scales is proposed by using the multiple time scales method.

Research Article

Oceans, Lakes, and Stromatolites on Mars

Billions of years ago, the Northern Hemisphere of Mars may have been covered by at least one ocean and thousands of lakes and rivers. These findings, based initially on telescopic observations and images by the Mariner and Viking missions, led investigators to hypothesize that stromatolite fashioning cyanobacteria may have proliferated in the surface waters, and life may have been successfully transferred between Earth and Mars via tons of debris ejected into the space following bolide impact. Studies conducted by NASA’s robotic rovers also indicate that Mars was wet and habitable and may have been inhabited in the ancient past. It has been hypothesized that Mars subsequently lost its magnetic field, oceans, and atmosphere when bolides negatively impacted its geodynamo and that the remnants of the Martian seas began to evaporate and became frozen beneath the surface. As reviewed here, twenty-five investigators have published evidence of Martian sedimentary structures that resemble microbial mats and stromatolites, which may have been constructed billions of years ago on ancient lake shores and in receding bodies of water, although if these formations are abiotic or biotic is unknown. These findings parallel the construction of the first stromatolites on Earth. The evidence reviewed here does not prove but supports the hypothesis that ancient Mars had oceans (as well as lakes) and was habitable and inhabited, and life may have been transferred between Earth and Mars billions of years ago due to powerful solar winds and life-bearing ejecta propelled into the space following the bolide impact.

Research Article

Nucleonic Direct Urca Processes and Cooling of the Massive Neutron Star by Antikaon Condensations

Nucleonic direct Urca processes and cooling of the massive neutron stars are studied by considering antikaon condensations. Calculations are performed in the relativistic mean field and isothermal interior approximations. Neutrino energy losses of the nucleonic direct Urca processes are reduced when the optical potential of antikaons changes from to  MeV. If the center density of the massive neutron stars is a constant, the masses taper off with the optical potential of antikaons, and neutrino luminosities of the nucleonic direct Urca processes decrease for but first increase and then decrease for larger . Large optical potential of antikaons results in warming of the nonsuperfluid massive neutron stars. Massive neutron stars turn warmer with the protonic superfluids. However, the decline of the critical temperatures of the protonic superfluids for the large optical potential of antikaons can speed up the cooling of the massive neutron stars.

Research Article

The Slow Spinning Motion of a Rigid Body in Newtonian Field and External Torque

In this paper, the problem of the slow spinning motion of a rigid body about a point O, being fixed in space, in the presence of the Newtonian force field and external torque is considered. We achieve the slow spin by giving the body slow rotation with a sufficiently small angular velocity component about the moving z-axis. We obtain the periodic solutions in a new domain of the angular velocity vector component , define a large parameter proportional to , and use the technique of the large parameter for solving this problem. Geometric interpretations of motions will be illustrated. Comparison of the results with the previous works is considered. A discussion of obtained solutions and results is presented.

Advances in Astronomy
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate26%
Submission to final decision37 days
Acceptance to publication63 days
CiteScore2.800
Impact Factor2.353
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