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Advances in Astronomy
Volume 2013, Article ID 582965, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/582965
Research Article

On the Effects of Viscosity on the Shock Waves for a Hydrodynamical Case—Part I: Basic Mechanism

Physics Department, Arts & Science Faculty, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17100 Canakkale, Turkey

Received 19 June 2013; Revised 31 October 2013; Accepted 31 October 2013

Academic Editor: Gregory Laughlin

Copyright © 2013 Huseyin Cavus. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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