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Abstract and Applied Analysis
Volume 2014, Article ID 157573, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/157573
Research Article

Dynamics of the Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide, and Water Interaction across the Insect Spiracle

1School of Computational and Applied Mathematics, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa
2School of Animal, Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Wits, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa

Received 9 April 2014; Accepted 23 July 2014; Published 3 September 2014

Academic Editor: Igor Leite Freire

Copyright © 2014 S. M. Simelane et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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