Advances in Agriculture
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Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision59 days
Acceptance to publication124 days
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 Journal profile

Advances in Agriculture publishes research on the cultivation of soil and crops, and the rearing of livestock. Its focus is on new methods and technologies for improving agricultural processes, increasing yield, conservation and breeding.

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Advances in Agriculture maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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This journal's articles appear in a wide range of abstracting and indexing databases, and are covered by numerous other services that aid discovery and access. Find out more about where and how the content of this journal is available.

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Research Article

Yield, Yield Components, and Nutritive Value of Perennial Forage Grass Grown under Supplementary Irrigation

There is a distinct seasonality in the availability of feeds in the highlands of Ethiopia, reaching a peak and low levels towards the end of the rainy and dry season, respectively. Consequently, this trial was conducted to assess the yield performance and nutritive value of nine perennial grasses accessions from seven grass species under supplementary irrigation to produce feed year-round. The evaluated grasses species were two Urochloa (U. decumbens cv. ILRI-10871 and ILRI-13205), two Setaria (S. sphacelata cv. ILRI-143 and ILRI-6543), one Phalaris (Phalaris aquatica cv. Sirrosa), coloured Guinea (Panicum coloratum cv. Coloratum), Desho (Pennisetum glaucifolium cv. Kindu kosha), Napier (Pennisetum purpureum cv, ILRI-16791), and Rhodes (Chloris gayana cv. Massaba) variety. The experiment was carried out in a randomized complete block design. The chemical compositions of the grasses were scanned by, the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Results indicated that the plant height, dry matter, and crude protein yield were significantly affected by year, species (), and their interaction (). Moreover, species were significantly influenced in vitro dry matter digestible yield, relative feed value, and nutrient content (DM, CP, NDF, ADF, ADL, and IVDMD). Napier grass had superior in dry matter, crude protein, and in vitro dry matter digestible yield than the other perennial grasses species tested together. Thus, among the tested grasses species, Napier grass showed outstanding potential as a forage plant followed by Phalaris and Desho grass under supplementary irrigation in the central highland of Ethiopia.

Research Article

Saline Water Impact on Water Use Efficiency of Bitter Melon (Momordica charantia L) Using Drip Irrigation

Water shortage is a real problem in many parts of the world and finding alternative solutions such as the application of saline water in cropping systems is highly appreciated. Research on drip irrigation and soil salinity is still inadequate, and their effect on crop yield and water use efficiency (WUE) is a huge challenge for small farmers. The present study was conducted in Malir, a semiarid region in the Sindh province of Pakistan. The purpose was to estimate the effects of two different qualities of irrigation water including fresh quality water (IT1 0.56 dS m−1) and saline groundwater (IT2 2.89 dS m−1) on WUE using drip irrigation technology in 2018–19. The experimental design was complete randomized block design (RCBD) with two treatments of irrigation: (1) freshwater (IT1) with 0.56 dS m−1 electrical conductivity and (2) saline water (IT2) with 2.89 dS m−1 electrical conductivity. The average biomass and crop yield under IT1 were 10.2 t.ha−1 and 7.4 t.ha−1, respectively, and were found higher than those under IT2 (7.3 t−1 and 4.2 t.ha−1, respectively). Hence, both the treatments remained equally effective in season 1 as compared to season 2 (). The WUE of bitter melon under IT1 was 1.60 and 1.56 kg.m−3 in seasons 1 and 2, respectively, and was higher than those under IT2 which were observed 1.21 and 1.07 kg.m−3 in seasons 1 and 2, respectively.

Research Article

Screening of Soybean Genotypes for Waterlogging Stress Tolerance and Understanding the Physiological Mechanisms

Waterlogging is a common form of abiotic stress that severely impedes global soybean production. Targeting this issue, an experiment was carried out at Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University during August–November 2019 to screen out the waterlogging tolerance and yield performances of selected soybean genotypes. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized design (CRD) with three replications consisting of 2 water levels (control and waterlogging) and 12 genotypes (Sohag, BARI Soybean-5, BINAsoybean-1, BINAsoybean-2, BINAsoybean-3, BINAsoybean-5, BINAsoybean-6, SGB-1, SGB-3, SGB-4, SGB-5, and GC-840). On the 15th day after sowing, plants were exposed to waterlogging for 12 days. Waterlogging remarkably declined the growth and yield of all the soybean genotypes compared to control. Reduced plant height, relative water content, above-ground fresh and dry weight, SPAD value, leaf area, number of leaves, branches, pods, seeds pod−1, 100-seed weight, and seed yield plant−1 were observed under waterlogging stress. Conversely, mortality rate and electrolyte leakage were increased under the same condition. The waterlogged plants showed delayed flowering and maturity compared with the control plants. However, among the 12 genotypes, Sohag, BARI Soybean-5, GC-840, BINAsoybean-1, and BINAsoybean-2 showed better waterlogging tolerance. These genotypes showed a greater number of adventitious roots in the base of their stem, which probably helped plants to thrive under waterlogging conditions.

Research Article

Adoption of Modern Hive Beekeeping Technology: The Case of Kacha-Birra Woreda, Kembata Tembaro Zone, Southern Ethiopia

Beekeeping is one of the livelihood options available to Ethiopian farmers. The objectives of this study were to analyze the level of adoption of modern hive technology by farmers and to identify the variables influencing the adoption of modern beekeeping hive technology in Kacha-Birra Woreda. Primary data were collected from 89 respondents chosen using a multistage sampling process, while qualitative data were collected through focus group discussion and key informant interviews. Data were analyzed using a binary logit regression model and descriptive statistics. According to the results of the model, several factors, such as the educational level of the respondents, the size of the land, the extension, the contact, and the access to financing and market, had a substantial impact on the adoption of modern hive beekeeping technology. It is suggested that the Livestock and Fish Resource Development office develops a strategy to help the community's illiterate members benefit more from the use of contemporary hive beekeeping technologies, develops a strategy to benefit farmers who have large land sizes with modern hive beekeeping technology, establishes extension contact with farmers before technology innovation leads to better adoption of technology, and strongly advises to link a strategy with micro-enterprises. Promotional activities focused on preventing the access to the market of respondents that must ensure their active participation in adoption.

Research Article

Yield and Growth Response of Maize (Zea mays L.) to Varietal and Nitrogen Application in the Guinea Savanna Agro-Ecology of Ghana

Background and Objective. Maize is one of the oldest cultivated crops. It is the third most important cereal after wheat and rice globally. Compared to all other cereals, maize has the highest average yield per unit area. The objective of the research was to evaluate maize varietal response to different nitrogen fertilizer rates. Materials and Methods. The treatment consisted of two factors, namely six varieties of maize and four levels of nitrogen application rates. These were arranged in 6 × 4 factorial combinations and laid out using randomized complete block design (RCBD) with three replications. The data collected were subjected to combined analysis for variation in factorial experiments in RCBD using Genstat statistical package edition 18. The means were separated using Duncan’s multiple range test at a 5% probability level. Results. The study revealed that varieties, such as IWD-C3-SYN-F2 and OBATAMPA, produced the highest grain yield and growth parameters (agronomic traits) relative to other varieties. The maximum grain yield and biomass production also occurred at the nitrogen application rates of 90 and 120 kg N/ha. Conclusion. Varieties, such as IWD-C3-SYN-F2 and OBATAMPA, and N rate of 90 kg N/ha are, therefore, recommended to be used for maize production by the resource-poor farmers in the Guinea Savanna Agro-Ecology of Ghana.

Review Article

Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Smallholders’ Cropping Systems in Sub-Saharan Africa

Increased concentration of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas (GHG), is of great concern due to its impact on ozone layer depletion leading to climate change. Ozone layer depletion allows penetration of ultraviolet radiations, which are hazardous to human health. Climate change culminates in reduced food productivity. Limited empirical studies have been conducted in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) to quantify and understand the dynamics of soil N2O fluxes from smallholder cropping systems. The available literature on soil N2O fluxes in SSA is limited; hence, there is a pressing need to consolidate it to ease mitigation targeting and policy formulation initiatives. We reviewed the state of N2O emissions from selected cropping systems, drivers that significantly influence N2O emissions, and probable soil N2O emissions mitigation options from 30 studies in SSA cropping systems have been elucidated here. The review outcome indicates that coffee, tea, maize, and vegetables emit N2O ranging from 1 to 1.9, 0.4 to 3.9, 0.1 to 4.26, and 48 to 113.4 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr−1, respectively. The yield-scaled and N2O emissions factors ranged between 0.08 and 67 g N2O-N kg−1 and 0.01 and 4.1%, respectively, across cropping systems. Soil characteristics, farm management practices, and climatic and environmental conditions were significant drivers influencing N2O emissions across SSA cropping systems. We found that site-specific soil N2O emissions mitigation measures are required due to high variations in N2O drivers across SSA. We conclude that appropriate fertilizer and organic input management combined with improved soil management practices are potential approaches in N2O emissions mitigation in SSA. We recommend that (i) while formulating soil N2O emissions mitigation approaches, in SSA, policymakers should consider site-specific targeting approaches, and (ii) more empirical studies need to be conducted in diverse agroecological zones of SSA to qualify various mitigation options on N2O emissions, yield-scaled N2O emissions, and N2O emission factors which are essential in improving national and regional GHG inventories.

Advances in Agriculture
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate12%
Submission to final decision59 days
Acceptance to publication124 days
CiteScore-
Journal Citation Indicator-
Impact Factor-
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