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Advances in Agriculture
Volume 2014, Article ID 542703, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/542703
Review Article

Ecological Complexity and the Success of Fungal Biological Control Agents

1Soil & Land Resources Division, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA
2Department of Plant, Soil, & Entomological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844, USA

Received 5 February 2014; Revised 29 April 2014; Accepted 30 April 2014; Published 1 June 2014

Academic Editor: Tibor Janda

Copyright © 2014 Guy R. Knudsen and Louise-Marie C. Dandurand. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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