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Advances in Agriculture
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 958503, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/958503
Research Article

Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Aqueous Extracts from Sorghum bicolor Stem and Zea mays (Roots and Tassel) on the Germination and Seedling Growth of Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.)

Department of Plant Science, Ekiti State University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria

Received 8 April 2014; Revised 24 August 2014; Accepted 24 August 2014; Published 2 October 2014

Academic Editor: Albino Maggio

Copyright © 2014 Modupe Janet Ayeni and Joshua Kayode. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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