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Advances in Civil Engineering
Volume 2016, Article ID 4167329, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4167329
Research Article

Modelling Blast Effects on a Reinforced Concrete Bridge

1Department of Civil Engineering, Laboratory of Reinforced Concrete, Democritus University of Thrace, V. Sofias 12, 671 00 Xanthi, Greece
2Department of Civil Engineering, The Lassonde Faculty of Engineering, York University, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Received 21 April 2016; Revised 27 June 2016; Accepted 28 June 2016

Academic Editor: Chiara Bedon

Copyright © 2016 Markellos Andreou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The detailed investigation of blast phenomena and their catastrophic effects on existing structures are the main objectives of the present paper. It is well known that blast phenomena may be characterized by significant complexity, often involving complicated wave propagation effects as well as distinguishable material behaviors. Considering the above and in an attempt to provide a simplified modelling approach for the simulation of blast effects, a novel procedure is presented herein based on well-established methodologies and common engineering practices. In the above framework, firstly, the “predominant” deformation shape of the structure is estimated based on elastic finite element simulations under blast loads and then the structural response of the system is evaluated as a result of common computational beam-element tools such as displacement-based pushover analysis. The proposed methodology provides an immediate first estimation of the structural behavior under blast loads, based on familiar engineering procedures. A two-span reinforced concrete bridge was thoroughly investigated and the results provide insightful information regarding the damage patterns and localization.