Advances in Condensed Matter Physics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate48%
Submission to final decision25 days
Acceptance to publication66 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.160
Impact Factor1.845

Analogous Atomic and Electronic Properties between and Defects in Hexagonal Boron Nitride

Read the full article

 Journal profile

Advances in Condensed Matter Physics publishes research on the experimental and theoretical study of the physics of materials in solid, liquid, amorphous, and exotic states.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor, Professor Ulloa, is based at Ohio University and is a condensed matter theorist. His research is focussed on the electronic properties of nanostructures including quantum dots and nanowires, as well as proximity effects in 2D crystals.

 Special Issues

Do you think there is an emerging area of research that really needs to be highlighted? Or an existing research area that has been overlooked or would benefit from deeper investigation? Raise the profile of a research area by leading a Special Issue.

Latest Articles

More articles
Research Article

A -Type Magnetic Semiconductor (Sr, Na)(Zn, Mn)2Sb2 Isostructural to 122-Type Iron-Based Superconductors

A new diluted magnetic semiconductor (Sr, Na)(Zn, Mn)2Sb2 has been successfully synthesized by doping Na and Mn into the parent compound , which has a -type crystal structure (space group , No. 164, ) isostructural to the 122-type iron-based superconductor . No magnetic ordering has been observed when only spins are doped by (Zn, Mn) substitution. Only with carriers codoped by (Sr, Na) substitution, a ferromagnetic ordering occurs below the maximum Curie temperature ∼9.5 K. Comparing with other -type diluted magnetic semiconductors, we will show that negative chemical pressure suppresses the Curie temperature.

Research Article

First-Principles Study on Adsorption and Decomposition of NOx on Mo (110) Surface

Based on the density functional theory, the adsorption and decomposition of NOx (x = 1, 2) on Mo (110) surface are studied with first-principles calculations. Results show that the stable structures of NO2/Mo (110) are MoNO2 (T, μ1-N), MoNO2 (H, μ3-N, O, O′), MoNO2 (S, η2-O, O′), and MoNO2 (L, η2-O, O′). The corresponding adsorption energies for the structures are −3.83 eV, −3.40 eV, −2.81 eV, and −2.60 eV, respectively. Besides, the stable structures of NO/Mo (110) are MoNO (H, μ1-N), MoNO (H, μ2-N, O), and MoNO (H, η1-N) with the corresponding adsorption energies of −3.75 eV, −3.57 eV, and −3.01 eV, respectively. N and O atoms are easily adsorbed at the hollow sites on Mo (110) surfaces, and their adsorption energies reach −7.02 eV and −7.70 eV, respectively. The preferable decomposition process of MoNO2 (H, μ3-N, O, O′) shows that the first and second deoxidation processes need to overcome energy barriers of 0.11 eV and 0.64 eV, respectively. All these findings indicate that NO2 is relatively easy to dissociate on Mo (110) surface.

Research Article

Plasmon Mediation of Charge Pairing in High Temperature Superconductors

A Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of a nonzero momentum Cooper pair constitutes a composite boson or simply a boson. We demonstrated that the quantum coherence of the two-component BEC (boson and fermion condensates) is controlled by plasmons. It has been proposed that plasmons, observed in both electron-doped and hole-doped cuprates, originates from the long-range Coulomb screening, where the transfer momentum . We further show that the screening mediates boson-fermion pairing at condensate state. While only about 1 of plasmon energy mediates the charge pairing, most of the plasmon energy is used to overcome the modes that compete against superconductivity such as phonons, charge density waves, antiferromagnetism, and damping effects. Additionally, the dependence of frequency of plasmons on the material of a superconductor is also explored. This study gives a quantum explanation of the modes that enhance and those that inhibit superconductivity. The study informs the nature of electromagnetic radiations (EMR) that can enhance the critical temperature of such materials.

Research Article

A First-Principles Study of Gas Molecule Adsorption on Carbon-, Nitrogen-, and Oxygen-Doped Two-Dimensional Borophene

A first-principles study was performed to investigate the adsorption properties of gas molecules (CO, CO2, NO, and NO2) on carbon- (C-), nitrogen- (N-), and oxygen-doped (O) borophene. The adsorption energies, adsorption configurations, Mulliken charge population, surface work functions, and density of states (DOS) of the most stable doped borophene/gas-molecule configurations were calculated, and the interaction mechanisms between the gas molecules and the doped borophene were further analyzed. The results indicated that most of the gas molecules exhibited strong chemisorption at the VB site (the center of valley bottom B–B bond) of the doped borophene (compared to pristine borophene). Electronic property analysis of the C-doped borophene/CO2 and the NO2 adsorption system revealed that there were numerous charge transfers from the C-doped borophene to the CO2 and NO2 molecules. This indicated that C-doped borophene was an electron donor, and the CO2 and NO2 molecules served as electron acceptors. In contrast to variations in the adsorption energies, electronic properties, and surface work functions of the different gas, C-, N-, and O-doped borophene adsorption systems, we concluded that the C-, N-, and O-doped borophene materials will improve the sensitivity of CO, CO2, and NO2 molecule; this improvement of adsorption properties indicated that C-, N-, and O-doped borophene materials are excellent candidates for surface work functions transistor to detect gas molecules.

Research Article

Thermal Conductivity of Graphitic Carbon Nitride Nanotubes: A Molecular Dynamics Study

Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) nanotubes are recently gaining increasing interest due to their extraordinary physicochemical properties. In the following, we report on simulations using a method of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and focus on the thermal conductivity variation of g-C3N4 nanotubes with respect to different temperatures, diameters, and chiral angles. In spite of the variation of diameters and chiral angles, the structure of nanotubes possesses high stability in the temperature range from 200 K to 600 K. Although there is little change of the thermal conductivity per unit arc length for nanotubes with the same diameter at different temperatures, it decreases significantly with increasing diameters at the same temperature. The thermal conductivity at different chiral angles has little to do with how temperature changes. Simulation results show that the vibrational density of states of nanotubes distributed, respectively, at ∼11 THz and ∼32 THz, indicating that heat in nanotubes is mostly carried by phonons with frequencies lower than 10 THz.

Research Article

First-Principles Investigation of Structural, Electronic, and Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Si-Doped Monolayer BN

We performed spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of silicon- (Si-) doped monolayer boron nitride (BN). The present study revealed that structural parameters like bond length, bond angle, and lattice parameters increase as Si-doped in the B site of monolayer BN. However, the bandgap of monolayer BN is reduced in the presence of the Si dopant. Moreover, the obtained magnetic moment and analysis of the total density of states (TDOS) show that Si-doped monolayer BN displays ferromagnetism. The calculated ferromagnetic transition temperature (Tc) value for Si concentration of 12.5% is 476 K which exceeds room temperature. The findings are avenues to enhance the application of monolayer BN for spintronics.

Advances in Condensed Matter Physics
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate48%
Submission to final decision25 days
Acceptance to publication66 days
CiteScore2.100
Journal Citation Indicator0.160
Impact Factor1.845
 Submit

Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2020, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.