Analytical Cellular Pathology
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Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision109 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore4.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.570
Impact Factor4.133

Article of the Year 2021

Extracellular Vesicles in the Cornea: Insights from Other Tissues

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 Journal profile

Analytical Cellular Pathology provides a forum for pathologists and medical practitioners working in the cellular pathology field. Topics covered include cytology, carcinogenesis, cell receptors, biomarkers, diagnostic pathology, and immunopathology.

 Editor spotlight

Chief Editor Professor Dimitrios Karamichos focuses on investigating corneal wound healing and dystrophies with a particular interest in the effect of transforming growth factor-β3 or TGF- β3 on corneal stromal cells and their extracellular environment.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Clinical Significance of TUBGCP4 Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

We aim to investigate the expression and clinical significance of the tubulin gamma complex-associated protein 4 (TUBGCP4) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The mRNA expression of TUBGCP4 in HCC tissues was analyzed using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Paired HCC and adjacent nontumor tissues were obtained from HCC patients to measure the protein expression of TUBGCP4 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and to analyze the relationship between TUBGCP4 protein expression and the clinicopathological characteristics and the prognosis of HCC patients. We found that TUBGCP4 mRNA expression was upregulated in HCC tissues from TCGA database. IHC analysis showed that TUBGCP4 was positively expressed in 61.25% (49/80) of HCC tissues and 77.5% (62/80) of adjacent nontumor tissues. The Chi-square analysis indicated that the positive rate of TUBGCP4 expression between HCC tissues and the adjacent nontumor tissues was statistically different (). Furthermore, we found that TUBGCP4 protein expression was correlated with carbohydrate antigen (CA-199) levels of HCC patients (). Further, survival analysis showed that the overall survival time and tumor-free survival time in the TUBGCP4 positive group were significantly higher than those of the negative group (), indicating that the positive expression of TUBGCP4 was related to a better prognosis of HCC patients. COX model showed that TUBGCP4 was an independent prognostic factor for HCC patients. Our study indicates that TUBGCP4 protein expression is downregulated in HCC tissues and has a relationship with the prognosis of HCC patients.

Research Article

Myosin 1b Participated in the Modulation of Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Caused H9c2 Cell Apoptosis and Autophagy

Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury seriously threats the health and life of patients with ischemia heart disease. Herein, we probed the potential influence of myosin 1b (myo1b) on hypoxia/reoxygenation- (H/R-) stimulated cardiomyocyte H9c2 cell apoptosis and autophagy. After H/R stimulation, the myo1b mRNA level in H9c2 cells was tested via qRT-PCR. Myo1b overexpression plasmid (OE-myo1b) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting myo1b (si-myo1b) were transfected into H9c2 cells to alter myo1b expression in H9c2 cells. Following H/R stimulation and/or OE-myo1b (or si-myo1b) transfection, H9c2 cell apoptosis, proliferation, and autophagy were detected, respectively. We found that H/R stimulation reduced the mRNA level of myo1b in H9c2 cells and resulted in H9c2 cell apoptosis, proliferation inhibition, and autophagy. Overexpression of myo1b reversed the H/R-resulted H9c2 cell apoptosis, proliferation inhibition, and autophagy. Silence of myo1b had opposite effects, which promoted H9c2 cell apoptosis, reduced cell proliferation, and accelerated cell autophagy. Taken together, Myo1b took part in the modulation of H/R-stimulated cardiomyocyte apoptosis and autophagy, which might be serve as a potential endogenous target for prevention and therapy of I/R injury.

Research Article

Model of Liver Fibrosis Induction by Thioacetamide in Rats for Regenerative Therapy Studies

Hepatic fibrosis is caused by chronic injury due to toxic, infectious, or metabolic causes, and it may progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. There is currently no antifibrotic therapy authorized for human use; however, there are promising studies using cell therapies. There are also no animal models that exactly reproduce human liver fibrosis that can be used to better understand the mechanisms of its regression and identify new targets for treatment and therapeutic approaches. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have experimentally demonstrated fibrosis regression effects, but it is necessary to have an animal model of advanced liver fibrosis to evaluate the effect of these cells. The aim of this work was to establish a protocol for the induction of advanced liver fibrosis in rats using thioacetamide (TAA), which will allow us to perform trials using MSC as a possible therapy for fibrosis regression. For this purpose, we selected 24 female rats and grouped them into three experimental groups: the control group (G-I) without treatment and groups II (G-II) and III (G-III) that received TAA by intraperitoneal injection for 24 weeks. Then, adipose mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) were infused intravenously. Groups G-I and G-II were sacrificed 7 days after the last dose of ASC, and G-III was sacrificed 8 weeks after the last ASC infusion, all with xylazine/ketamine (40 mg/kg). The protocol used in this work established a model of advanced hepatic fibrosis as corroborated by METAVIR tests of the histological lesions; by the high levels of the markers α-SMA, CD68, and collagen type I; by functional alterations due to elevated markers of the hepatic lesions; and by alterations of the leukocytes, lymphocytes, and platelets. Finally, transplanted cells in the fibrous liver were detected. We conclude that TAA applied using the protocol introduced in this study induces a good model of advanced liver fibrosis in rats.

Research Article

Monocarboxylate Transporters: Role and Regulation in Corneal Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases that is known to cause structural and functional ocular complications. In the human cornea, DM-related complications affect the epithelium, stroma, and nerves. Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are a family of proton-linked plasma membrane transporters that carry monocarboxylates across plasma membranes. In the context of corneal health and disease, their role, presence, and function are largely undetermined and solely focused on the most common MCT isoforms, 1 through 4. In this study, we investigated the regulation of MCT1, 2, 4, 5, 8, and 10, in corneal DM, using established 3D self-assembled extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro models. Primary stromal corneal fibroblasts were isolated from healthy (HCFs), type I (T1DMs), and type II (T2DMs) DM donors. Monoculture 3D constructs were created by stimulating stromal cells on transwells with stable vitamin C for two or four weeks. Coculture 3D constructs were created by adding SH-SY5Y neurons at two different densities, 12 k and 500 k, on top of the monocultures. Our data showed significant upregulation of MCT1 at 4 weeks for HCF, T1DM, and T2DM monocultures, as well as the 500 k nerve cocultures. MCT8 was significantly upregulated in HCF and T1DM monocultures and all of the 500 k nerve cocultures. Further, MCT10 was only expressed at 4 weeks for all cocultures and was limited to HCFs and T1DMs in monocultures. Immunofluorescence analysis showed cytoplasmic MCT expression for all cell types and significant downregulation of both MCT2 and MCT4 in HCFs, when compared to T1DMs and T2DMs. Herein, we reveal the existence and modulation of MCTs in the human diabetic cornea in vitro. Changes appeared dependent on neuronal density, suggesting that MCTs are very likely critical to the neuronal defects observed in diabetic keratopathy/neuropathy. Further studies are warranted in order to fully delineate the role of MCTs in corneal diabetes.

Research Article

Transcription Factor FXR Activates DHRS9 to Inhibit the Cell Oxidative Phosphorylation and Suppress Colon Cancer Progression

Background. Colon cancer is a common gastrointestinal malignancy. It has been discovered that Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an imperative regulatory role in multitype cancers in recent years. However, its regulatory mechanism in colon cancer has not been clearly explored. This study intended to explore the molecular regulatory mechanism of FXR and its downstream genes on the malignant progression of colon cancer. Methods. The mRNA and protein expression of FXR in colon cancer cells were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effects of FXR on the biological function of colon cancer cells were measured by Cell Counting Kit-8, colony formation, and transwell assays. The downstream target gene of FXR was predicted by bioinformatics analysis and found to be associated with cellular oxidative phosphorylation. The binding relationship between FXR and its downstream gene dehydrogenase/reductase member 9 (DHRS9) was verified through luciferase reporter assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The changes of oxidative phosphorylation were detected by Western blot and oxygen consumption rate determination. The effect of FXR/DHRS9 axis on the malignant progression of colon cancer cells was further confirmed by rescue experiments. Results. FXR was underexpressed in colon cancer tissues and cells, and overexpressing FXR could repress the malignant behaviors of colon cancer cells. Besides, DHRS9 was a downstream gene of FXR, and FXR/DHRS9 inhibited the deterioration of colon cancer through inhibiting oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, promoting FXR expression in colon cancer cells could partially reverse the biological function changes caused by silencing DHRS9 expression. Conclusion. FXR inhibited the oxidative phosphorylation and inhibited the malignant progression of colon cancer cells via targeting DHRS9.

Research Article

LINC02389/miR-7-5p Regulated Cisplatin Resistance of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer via Promoting Oxidative Stress

Background. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the main treatment for NSCLC. However, cisplatin resistance of NSCLC cells is a major challenge for NSCLC treatment. Materials and Methods. qRT-PCR and Western blot were performed to detect the expression of LINC02389 and miR-7-5p in NSCLC tissues and cell lines. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay and flow cytometry assay were applied to exam cell proliferation and apoptosis rate of NSCLC cells. The interaction between LINC02389 and miR-7-5p was verified by dual luciferase reporter gene assay, RNA pull-down assay, and RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) assay. Additionally, cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells were generated to assess the biological function of LINC02389 and miR-7-5p in cisplatin resistance of NSCLC. Results. LINC02389 was highly expressed in NSCLC tissues and was correlated with poor prognosis of NSCLC patients. Knockdown of LINC02389 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis of NSCLC, whereas miR-7-5p knockdown exerted the opposite effects. Moreover, LINC02389 negatively regulated the expression of miR-7-5p. In addition, LINC02389 was overexpressed, yet miR-7-5p was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant NSCLC cells compared with their parental cells. Moreover, oxidative stress biomarkers were overexpressed in cisplatin-resistant cells and were regulated by LINC02389. Besides, LINC02389 could reverse the inhibitory effect of cisplatin on NSCLC cells, which was partially reversed by attenuating the expression of miR-7-5p. Conclusion. Our research firstly demonstrated that lncRNA LINC02389 acted as an oncogene to promote progression, oxidative stress, and cisplatin resistance through sponging miR-7-5p and may provide therapeutic targets for NSCLC.

Analytical Cellular Pathology
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate21%
Submission to final decision109 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore4.400
Journal Citation Indicator0.570
Impact Factor4.133
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.