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Analytical Cellular Pathology
Volume 2015, Article ID 972891, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/972891
Review Article

The Role of Organelle Stresses in Diabetes Mellitus and Obesity: Implication for Treatment

1Graduate Institute of Medical Genomics and Proteomics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
2Department of Internal Medicine and Center for Obesity, Lifestyle and Metabolic Surgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 100, Taiwan
3Institute of Biomedical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei 100, Taiwan
4Graduate Institute of Pathology, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
5Department of Pathology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei 100, Taiwan
6College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan
7Institute of Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan

Received 15 August 2015; Accepted 8 October 2015

Academic Editor: Poornima Mahavadi

Copyright © 2015 Yi-Cheng Chang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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