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Analytical Cellular Pathology
Volume 2016, Article ID 1628057, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1628057
Research Article

In Vivo Flow Cytometry of Circulating Tumor-Associated Exosomes

1Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
2Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA
3Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205, USA

Received 2 June 2016; Accepted 1 September 2016

Academic Editor: Giovanni Tuccari

Copyright © 2016 Jacqueline Nolan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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