Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Analytical Cellular Pathology
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9307549, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9307549
Review Article

Tumor Associated Macrophages in Kidney Cancer

1Institute of Carcinogenesis, NN Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia
2Medical Faculty Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karls University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany

Received 3 July 2016; Accepted 20 September 2016

Academic Editor: Giovanni Tuccari

Copyright © 2016 Olga V. Kovaleva et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. A. Mantovani, P. Allavena, and A. Sica, “Tumour-associated macrophages as a prototypic type II polarised phagocyte population: role in tumour progression,” European Journal of Cancer, vol. 40, no. 11, pp. 1660–1667, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. A. Mantovani, B. Bottazzi, F. Colotta, S. Sozzani, and L. Ruco, “The origin and function of tumor-associated macrophages,” Immunology Today, vol. 13, no. 7, pp. 265–270, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. A. Mantovani and M. Locati, “Tumor-associated macrophages as a paradigm of macrophage plasticity, diversity, and polarization: lessons and open questions,” Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, vol. 33, no. 7, pp. 1478–1483, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. H. Toge, T. Inagaki, Y. Kojimoto, T. Shinka, and I. Hara, “Angiogenesis in renal cell carcinoma: the role of tumor-associated macrophages: Original Article: Clinical Investigation,” International Journal of Urology, vol. 16, no. 10, pp. 801–807, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. A. Garcia, C. L. Cowey, and P. A. Godley, “Renal cell carcinoma,” Current Opinion in Oncology, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 266–271, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. M. C. Yu, T. M. Mack, R. Hanisch, C. Cicioni, and B. E. Henderson, “Cigarette smoking, obesity, diuretic use, and coffee consumption as risk factors for renal cell carcinoma,” Journal of the National Cancer Institute, vol. 77, no. 2, pp. 351–356, 1986. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. W. K. Rathmell and P. A. Godley, “Recent updates in renal cell carcinoma,” Current Opinion in Oncology, vol. 22, no. 3, pp. 250–256, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. M. Stein, S. Keshav, N. Harris, and S. Gordon, “Interleukin 4 potently enhances murine macrophage mannose receptor activity: a marker of alternative immunologic macrophage activation,” Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol. 176, no. 1, pp. 287–292, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  9. A. Gratchev, P. Guillot, N. Hakiy et al., “Alternatively activated macrophages differentially express fibronectin and its splice variants and the extracellular matrix protein βIG-H3,” Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, vol. 53, no. 4, pp. 386–392, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. A. Gratchev, J. Kzhyshkowska, S. Kannookadan et al., “Activation of a TGF-β-specific multistep gene expression program in mature macrophages requires glucocorticoid-mediated surface expression of TGF-β receptor II,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 180, no. 10, pp. 6553–6565, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. P. J. Murray, J. E. Allen, S. K. Biswas et al., “Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines,” Immunity, vol. 41, no. 1, pp. 14–20, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. S. Goerdt and C. E. Orfanos, “Other functions, other genes: alternative activation of antigen- presenting cells,” Immunity, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 137–142, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. S. Gordon, “Alternative activation of macrophages,” Nature Reviews Immunology, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 23–35, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. A. Gratchev, K. Schledzewski, P. Guillot, and S. Goerdt, “Alternatively activated antigen-presenting cells: molecular repertoire, immune regulation, and healing,” Skin Pharmacology and Applied Skin Physiology, vol. 14, no. 5, pp. 272–279, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. S. Goerdt, O. Politz, K. Schledzewski et al., “Alternative versus classical activation of macrophages,” Pathobiology, vol. 67, no. 5-6, pp. 222–226, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. D. J. Schaer, F. S. Boretti, A. Hongegger et al., “Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse CD163 homologue, a highly glucocorticoid-inducible member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich family,” Immunogenetics, vol. 53, no. 2, pp. 170–177, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. N. A. Elshourbagy, X. Li, J. Terrett et al., “Molecular characterization of a human scavenger receptor, human MARCO,” European Journal of Biochemistry, vol. 267, no. 3, pp. 919–926, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  18. A. Gratchev, J. Kzhyshkowska, J. Utikal, and S. Goerdt, “Interleukin-4 and dexamethasone counterregulate extracellular matrix remodelling and phagocytosis in type-2 macrophages,” Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, vol. 61, no. 1, pp. 10–17, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. E. Vannier, L. C. Miller, and C. A. Dinarello, “Coordinated antiinflammatory effects of interleukin 4: interleukin 4 suppresses interleukin 1 production but up-regulates gene expression and synthesis of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 89, no. 9, pp. 4076–4080, 1992. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. E. Vannier, R. de Waal Malefyt, A. Salazar-Montes, J. E. de Vries, and C. A. Dinarello, “Interleukin-13 (IL-13) induces IL-1 receptor antagonist gene expression and protein synthesis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells: inhibition by an IL-4 mutant protein,” Blood, vol. 87, no. 8, pp. 3307–3315, 1996. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. V. Kodelja, C. Müller, O. Politz, N. Hakij, C. E. Orfanos, and S. Goerdt, “Alternative macrophage activation-associated CC-chemokine-1, a novel structural homologue of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α with a Th2- associated expression pattern,” Journal of Immunology, vol. 160, no. 3, pp. 1411–1418, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. J. A. Van Ginderachter, K. Movahedi, G. Hassanzadeh Ghassabeh et al., “Classical and alternative activation of mononuclear phagocytes: picking the best of both worlds for tumor promotion,” Immunobiology, vol. 211, no. 6–8, pp. 487–501, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. C. Chang and Z. Werb, “The many faces of metalloproteases: cell growth, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis,” Trends in Cell Biology, vol. 11, no. 11, pp. S37–S43, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  24. Q. Liu, G. W. Zhang, C. Y. Zhu et al., “Clinicopathological significance of matrix metalloproteinase 2 protein expression in patients with renal cell carcinoma: a case-control study and meta-analysis,” Cancer Biomarkers, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 281–289, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  25. M. J. Duffy, “Urokinase plasminogen activator and its inhibitor, PAI-1, as prognostic markers in breast cancer: from pilot to level 1 evidence studies,” Clinical Chemistry, vol. 48, no. 8, pp. 1194–1197, 2002. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. P. A. Andreasen, L. Kjøller, L. Christensen, and M. J. Duffy, “The urokinase-type plasminogen activator system in cancer metastasis: a review,” International Journal of Cancer, vol. 72, no. 1, pp. 1–22, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. R. Hildenbrand, I. Dilger, A. Horlin, and H. J. Stutte, “Urokinase and macrophages in tumour angiogenesis,” British Journal of Cancer, vol. 72, no. 4, pp. 818–823, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. R. Hildenbrand, W. Glienke, V. Magdolen, H. Graeff, H.-J. Stutte, and M. Schmitt, “Urokinase receptor localization in breast cancer and benign lesions assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry,” Histochemistry and Cell Biology, vol. 110, no. 1, pp. 27–32, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  29. J. A. Foekens, H. A. Peters, M. P. Look et al., “The urokinase system of plasminogen activation and prognosis in 2780 breast cancer patients,” Cancer Research, vol. 60, no. 3, pp. 636–643, 2000. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. S. Fuessel, K. Erdmann, H. Taubert et al., “Prognostic impact of urokinase-type plasminogen activator system components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients without distant metastasis,” BMC Cancer, vol. 14, no. 1, article 974, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. Y. Komohara, H. Hasita, K. Ohnishi et al., “Macrophage infiltration and its prognostic relevance in clear cell renal cell carcinoma,” Cancer Science, vol. 102, no. 7, pp. 1424–1431, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. I. Daurkin, E. Eruslanov, T. Stoffs et al., “Tumor-associated macrophages mediate immunosuppression in the renal cancer microenvironment by activating the 15-lipoxygenase-2 pathway,” Cancer Research, vol. 71, no. 20, pp. 6400–6409, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. E. Eruslanov, T. Stoffs, W.-J. Kim et al., “Expansion of CCR8+ inflammatory myeloid cells in cancer patients with urothelial and renal carcinomas,” Clinical Cancer Research, vol. 19, no. 7, pp. 1670–1680, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  34. S. Ikemoto, N. Yoshida, K. Narita et al., “Role of tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma,” Oncology Reports, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 1843–1849, 2003. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. B. L. Petrella and M. P. Vincenti, “Interleukin-1β mediates metalloproteinase-dependent renal cell carcinoma tumor cell invasion through the activation of CCAAT enhancer binding protein β,” Cancer Medicine, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 17–27, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. M. Chittezhath, M. K. Dhillon, J. Y. Lim et al., “Molecular profiling reveals a tumor-promoting phenotype of monocytes and macrophages in human cancer progression,” Immunity, vol. 41, no. 5, pp. 815–829, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. C. Ma, Y. Komohara, K. Ohnishi et al., “Infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages is involved in CD44 expression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma,” Cancer Science, vol. 107, no. 5, pp. 700–707, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  38. Y. Komohara, T. Morita, D. A. Annan et al., “The coordinated actions of TIM-3 on cancer and myeloid cells in the regulation of tumorigenicity and clinical prognosis in clear cell renal cell carcinomas,” Cancer Immunology Research, vol. 3, no. 9, pp. 999–1007, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  39. L. Xu, Y. Zhu, L. Chen et al., “Prognostic value of diametrically polarized tumor-associated macrophages in renal cell carcinoma,” Annals of Surgical Oncology, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 3142–3150, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. C. Li, B. Liu, Z. Dai, and Y. Tao, “Knockdown of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1) impairs macrophage infiltration, angiogenesis and growth of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CRCC),” Cancer Biology and Therapy, vol. 12, no. 10, pp. 872–880, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. C. L. Behnes, F. Bremmer, B. Hemmerlein, A. Strauss, P. Ströbel, and H.-J. Radzun, “Tumor-associated macrophages are involved in tumor progression in papillary renal cell carcinoma,” Virchows Archiv, vol. 464, no. 2, pp. 191–196, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. O. Politz, A. Gratchev, P. A. G. McCourt et al., “Stabilin-1 and -2 constitute a novel family of fasciclin-like hyaluronan receptor homologues,” Biochemical Journal, vol. 362, no. 1, pp. 155–164, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. A. Gratchev, C. Schmuttermaier, S. Mamidi, L. M. Gooi, S. Goerdt, and J. Kzhyshkowska, “Expression of osteoarthritis marker YKL-39 is stimulated by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) and IL-4 in differentiating macrophages,” Biomarker Insights, vol. 2008, no. 3, pp. 39–44, 2008. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. J. Kzhyshkowska, S. Mamidi, A. Gratchev et al., “Novel stabilin-1 interacting chitinase-like protein (SI-CLP) is up-regulated in alternatively activated macrophages and secreted via lysosomal pathway,” Blood, vol. 107, no. 8, pp. 3221–3228, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. M. Buldakov, M. Zavyalova, N. Krakhmal et al., “CD68+, but not stabilin-1+ tumor associated macrophages in gaps of ductal tumor structures negatively correlate with the lymphatic metastasis in human breast cancer,” Immunobiology, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. Y. Komohara, Y. Fujiwara, K. Ohnishi, and M. Takeya, “Tumor-associated macrophages: potential therapeutic targets for anti-cancer therapy,” Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, vol. 99, pp. 180–185, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus