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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 470695, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.4061/2010/470695
Research Article

Fc 𝛾 RIIA Genotypes and Its Association with Anti-C1q Autoantibodies in Lupus Nephritis (LN) Patients from Western India

National Institute of Immunohaematology, Indian Council of Medical Research, 13th floor, KEM Hospital, Parel, Mumbai 400 012, India

Received 10 July 2009; Revised 15 October 2009; Accepted 6 December 2009

Academic Editor: Edmond J. Yunis

Copyright © 2010 Vandana Pradhan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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