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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 859145, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/859145
Review Article

NLRP3 Inflammasome and MS/EAE

1Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC-3010, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center, DUMC-3010, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 1 August 2012; Accepted 12 November 2012

Academic Editor: Giovanni Savettieri

Copyright © 2013 Makoto Inoue and Mari L. Shinohara. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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