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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2015, Article ID 503087, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/503087
Research Article

The Attenuated Live Yellow Fever Virus 17D Infects the Thymus and Induces Thymic Transcriptional Modifications of Immunomodulatory Genes in C57BL/6 and BALB/C Mice

1Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
2Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Institut des Maladies Emergentes et des Thérapies Innovantes, Service de Recherches en Hémato-Immunologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, 1 avenue Claude Vellefaux, Bâtiment Lailler, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France
3Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, UMR E5, Institut Universitaire d’Hématologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, 1 avenue Claude Vellefaux, 75475 Paris Cedex 10, France
4Virology Research Center, Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of São Paulo, Avenida Bandeirantes 3900, 14049-900 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 25 June 2015; Revised 17 August 2015; Accepted 26 August 2015

Academic Editor: Xu-Jie Zhou

Copyright © 2015 Breno Luiz Melo-Lima et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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