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Autoimmune Diseases
Volume 2015, Article ID 636207, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/636207
Review Article

Slipping through the Cracks: Linking Low Immune Function and Intestinal Bacterial Imbalance to the Etiology of Rheumatoid Arthritis

1Chondrex, Inc., 2607 151st Place NE, Redmond, WA 98052, USA
2Asama Chemicals Co., Ltd., 20-3 Nihonbashi Kodenmacho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 103, Japan

Received 26 September 2014; Accepted 5 December 2014

Academic Editor: Gabriel J. Tobón

Copyright © 2015 Kuniaki Terato et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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