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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2012, Article ID 617236, 33 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/617236
Review Article

Distribution and Fate of Military Explosives and Propellants in Soil: A Review

Natural Resources and Environmental Management, Ball State University, Muncie, IN 47306, USA

Received 30 November 2011; Revised 26 February 2012; Accepted 19 March 2012

Academic Editor: Jeffrey L. Howard

Copyright © 2012 John Pichtel. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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