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Applied and Environmental Soil Science
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 870616, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/870616
Research Article

Assessment of the Effectiveness of Ectomycorrhizal Inocula to Promote Growth and Root Ectomycorrhizal Colonization in Pinus patula Seedlings Using the Most Probable Number Technique

Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Calle 59 No. 63-20, 050034 Medellín, Colombia

Received 26 July 2014; Revised 23 November 2014; Accepted 25 November 2014; Published 8 December 2014

Academic Editor: Teodoro M. Miano

Copyright © 2014 Manuel Restrepo-Llano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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