Advances in Hematology
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Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore3.800
Impact Factor-

Assessing the Performance of Extended Half-Life Coagulation Factor VIII, FC Fusion Protein by Using Chromogenic and One-Stage Assays in Saudi Hemophilia A Patients

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Advances in Hematology publishes original research articles, review articles, and clinical studies in all areas of hematology.

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Advances in Hematology maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Demographics of Rhesus Phenotype of Blood Donors in Calabar: A Case Study of University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria

Background. Rhesus antigens have been documented to cause haemolytic disease of the newborn as well as acute and delayed transfusion reactions. This study was performed to evaluate the frequency of rhesus antigens (C, c, D, E, and e) in the studied population. Method. This study was a cross-sectional study involving 130 prospective blood donors attending University of Calabar Teaching Hospital (UCTH) donor clinic. Donors were grouped for Rh antisera (anti-E, anti-e, anti-C, anti-c, and anti-D) using the standard serologic technique. Result. The most prevalent Rh antigen was “c” (98.5%), followed by “D” (97.7%), while the least was “C” (30.7%). The most prevalent phenotype was cDe/cDe (R0R0). Conclusion. This work therefore concludes that the most prevalent rhesus antigen and rhesus phenotype was c and cDe/cDe among blood donors in University of Calabar Teaching Hospital.

Research Article

Alopecia and Iron Deficiency: An Interventional Pilot Study in Primary Care to Improve the Request of Ferritin

Background. The aim was to study the demographic and laboratory pattern of primary care patients with alopecia undergoing laboratory testing, more specifically, the request of hemoglobin and ferritin and values showing anemia and iron deficiency, and to evaluate the effects of an intervention involving automatic ferritin registration and measurement when not requested. Methods. Retrospective and prospective observational cross-sectional studies were conducted, as well as an intervention to automatically register and measure ferritin when not requested by the general practitioner. Results. There were 343 and 1032 primary care laboratory requests prompted by alopecia in the retrospective and prospective studies. Hemoglobin was requested in almost every patient and ferritin in 88%. 5% of the cohort had anemia, and 25% had iron deficiency. The intervention registered and measured that 123 ferritin and 24 iron deficiencies were detected in patients with alopecia, all women, at a cost of 10.6€. Conclusion. Primary care patients with alopecia and laboratory tests request were mainly young female. Our intervention added ferritin when not requested, detecting iron deficiency in 27.9% of women, potentially avoiding the adverse effects of iron deficiency on hair loss.

Research Article

Changes in Blood Profile from Steady State in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia Admitted for Vaso-occlusive Crisis and Acute Chest Syndrome

Close to half of all patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) will have at least one episode of acute chest syndrome (ACS) during their lifetime. Multiple cells and molecules involved with the inflammatory cascade play a role in the development of ACS. We found that patients with SCD who developed ACS as a complication of a vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) had a significant increase in leukocytes and decrease in platelets from their steady state when compared with a separate admission for VOC without ACS development. No significant change from steady state hemoglobin or reticulocyte count was noted between the two admissions. These results indicate that trending laboratory markers may be useful to predict patients at risk for ACS development.

Research Article

Comediation of Erythrocyte Haemolysis by Erythrocyte-Derived Microparticles and Complement during Malaria Infection

Background. Due to the sustained morbidity and mortality that malaria-associated anaemia imposes on patients, malaria is still a global threat, most especially, to residents in sub-Saharan Africa. Merozoite invasion and destruction of erythrocytes, a target for this study, have been necessary due to its unique nature and also since the erythrocytes suffer the most brunt of malarial infection leading to anaemia. The issue of malaria anaemia has to do with why uninfected RBCs get destroyed and even more so than infected ones. Studies have proposed that cytophilic anti-RSP2 (ring surface protein 2—merozoite rhoptry protein 2) antibodies present in sera enhance phagocytosis of RSP2-tagged RBCs by macrophages either directly or via complement, while others have proposed transfer of RSP2 to both infected and uninfected RBCs which may render them susceptible to phagocytosis. What is missing is the agent involved in the transfer of these parasite-induced surface proteins onto the uninfected RBCs, i.e., the mediator molecules. Considering the intracellular location of the parasite in the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane and the absence of a transport mechanism such as the Golgi apparatus within the mature RBC, since the latter has no nucleus, we propose that erythrocyte-derived microparticles (EMPs) may be the possible mediators. Aim. This study aimed at examining the immunological interactions between EMPs released during malarial infections and host erythrocytes that may lead to their lysis possibly through complement mediation. Methods. This was an experimental study during which malarial EMPs were isolated by differential centrifugation of malaria-positive plasma. This was followed by cell-based in vitro assays where malaria-positive EMPs were added to uninfected blood group “O” negative erythrocytes in the presence of complement and haemolysis checked for. Results and Conclusion. At a fixed volume of 50 μL complement, there were statistically significant () increases in mean percentage haemolysis as the volume of EMPs increased. Similarly, at a fixed volume of 50 μL EMPs, there were statistically significant () increases in mean percentage haemolysis with increasing volumes of complement. This was an indication that both complement and EMPs contribute significantly to uninfected erythrocyte haemolysis during malaria infection.

Clinical Study

Assessment of Confirmed Clinical Hypersensitivity to Rituximab in Patients Affected with B-Cell Neoplasia

Rituximab hypersensitivity reactions are rare but are one of the main causes of rituximab elimination from antilymphoma immunochemotherapy treatments. While the clinical picture may be indistinguishable from other infusion-related reactions, hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) do not disappear and instead become more intense with subsequent administrations. Objective. To describe the use of the 12-step protocol for desensitization to intravenous rituximab in clinical practice and the complementary study of a possible IgE-mediated HSR in the context of B-cell lymphoma treatment. Methods. A 12-step rituximab desensitization protocol was performed prospectively within clinical practice in 10 patients with a history of severe infusion reactions or in patients who had a repeated reaction at subsequent doses despite taking more intense preventive measures. Skin prick tests were performed at the time of reaction and at a later time to eliminate false negatives due to possible drug interference. Results. Overall, with the desensitization protocol, 70% of patients were able to complete the scheduled immunochemotherapy. Two patients had to discontinue the therapy due to clinical persistence and the third due to lymphoma progression. Intradermal tests with 0.1% rituximab were positive in only 20% of cases, demonstrating a mechanism of hypersensitivity. Conclusions. The 12-step desensitization protocol is very effective and assumable within healthcare practice. There is a need to determine the mechanism underlying the infusion reaction in a large proportion of cases due to the risk of future drug exposure.

Research Article

Blood Donors’ Age, Haemoglobin Type, G6PD Status, and Blood Group Impact Storability of CPDA-1 Banked Whole Blood: A Repeated-Measure Cohort Study in Cape Coast, Ghana

Background. The high prevalence of haemoglobin variants and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase disorder (G6PDd) in sub-Saharan Africa means that substantial proportions of donor blood units carry these red cell abnormalities. Aim. This study investigated the impact that inherited haemoglobin variants and/or G6PD status have on whole blood banked at 4–6°C for 35 days. Method. This repeated-measure cohort study was undertaken on 103 donor blood units collected into blood bag containing CPDA-1 anticoagulant. On days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 35, full blood count, osmotic-induced haemolysis, and plasma K+ levels were estimated. Also, on day 0, G6PD status, haemoglobin variants, % foetal haemoglobin, and blood group of donor units were determined using methaemoglobin reductase, cellulose acetate electrophoresis, modified Bekte alkali denaturation assay, and slide haemagglutination test, respectively. Result. Overall, although plasma K+ levels increased during storage, donor units from individuals ≥20 years, G6PD normal, Hb AC, or blood group B had comparatively higher percentage change in plasma K+ during storage. Osmotically induced haemolysis of donor units was significantly decreased in Hb AC (compared with Hb A or AS) donor units on days 7, 14, 21, and 35 ( in each case). G6PDd donor units had comparatively reduced osmotic-induced lysis compared with G6PD normal units, reaching a statistical significance on day 35 (). Also, Hb AC units had comparatively nonstatistically higher plasma K+ at all time points (compared with Hb A or AS). Furthermore, whereas donor units from individuals ≥20 years showed significantly higher median free haemoglobin on day 21 (compared to donor <20 years), when donor units were stratified per Hb variants, only Hb AS units had median free haemoglobin below the 0.8% threshold after 35 days’ storage. Conclusion. Age of donor, blood group, Hb AC variant, and G6PD status may be important considerations in the storability of whole blood.

Advances in Hematology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore3.800
Impact Factor-
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