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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 412163, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/412163
Research Article

Screening for Residual Disease in Pediatric Burkitt Lymphoma Using Consensus Primer Pools

1Department of Cell & Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96816, USA
2Department of Physiology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96816, USA
3Department of Pediatrics & Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96816, USA

Received 30 December 2008; Accepted 25 January 2009

Academic Editor: Thomas G. Gross

Copyright © 2009 Melissa Agsalda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Assessing molecular persistent or minimal residual disease (PD/MRD) in childhood Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is challenging because access to original tumor is usually needed to design patient-specific primers (PSPs). Because BL is characterized by rearranged immunoglobulin heavy chain ( ) genes, primer pools from regions were tested to detect PD/MRD, thus eliminating the need for original tumor. The focus of the current study was to assess the feasibility of using primer pools to detect disease in clinical specimens. Fourteen children diagnosed with B-NHL had follow-up repository specimens available to assess PD/MRD. Of the 14 patients, 12 were PD/MRD negative after 2 months of therapy and remained in remission at the end of therapy; 2/14 patients were PD/MRD positive at 2-3 months and later relapsed. PSP-based assays from these 14 patients showed 100% concordance with the current assay. This feasibility study warrants further investigation to assess PD/MRD using primer pools, which could have clinical significance as a real-time assessment tool to monitor pediatric BL and possibly other B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma therapy.