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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 142395, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/142395
Review Article

Hodgkin's Lymphomas: A Tumor Recognized by Its Microenvironment

Lymphoma Group, Spanish National Cancer Centre (CNIO), E-28029, Madrid, Spain

Received 30 June 2010; Accepted 3 October 2010

Academic Editor: Meral Beksac

Copyright © 2011 S. Montes-Moreno. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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