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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 473709, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/473709
Review Article

Heme Oxygenase-1: A Critical Link between Iron Metabolism, Erythropoiesis, and Development

1Laboratory for Blood Cell Development, Disciplines of Physiology, Anatomy and Histology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Medical Foundation Building, 92-94 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia
2Center for Vascular Research, Discipline of Pathology, School of Medical Sciences and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, Medical Foundation Building, 92–94 Parramatta Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia

Received 28 June 2011; Revised 13 September 2011; Accepted 15 September 2011

Academic Editor: S. Ballas

Copyright © 2011 Stuart T. Fraser et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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