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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2011, Article ID 510304, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/510304
Review Article

Hepcidin: A Critical Regulator of Iron Metabolism during Hypoxia

1Department of Nutrition, Dietetics & Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
2Military Nutrition Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), Natick, MA 01760, USA

Received 27 May 2011; Accepted 8 July 2011

Academic Editor: Angela Panoskaltsis-Mortari

Copyright © 2011 Korry J. Hintze and James P. McClung. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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