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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 717951, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/717951
Review Article

HCV Virus and Lymphoid Neoplasms

1Department of Hematology, Hakodate Municipal Hospital, 1–10-1 Minato-cho, Hakodate 041-8680, Japan
2Department of Clinical Pathology, Hakodate Municipal Hospital, 1–10-1 Minato-cho, Hakodate 041-8680, Japan
3Department of Hematology and Oncology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo 60-8638, Japan
4Department of Gastroenterology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo 60-8638, Japan

Received 13 March 2011; Accepted 7 May 2011

Academic Editor: Daisuke Ennishi

Copyright © 2011 Yutaka Tsutsumi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the viruses known to cause hepatic cancer. HCV is also believed to be involved in malignant lymphoma. In this paper, we investigated characteristics of malignant lymphoma cases that were anti-HCV antibody (HCV-Ab) positive. We were able to perform pathological examinations on 13 out of 14 HCV-positive cases. Of these, lymphoid tissues of 10 stained positive for HCV-Ab. There was no significant correlation between the degree of HCV staining and the rate of recurrence or resistance to treatment. However, there did appear to be a consistent decrease in the amount of HCV-RNA between pre- and posttreatment among HCV-Ab-positive cases; that is, treatment-resistant cases that exhibited resistance from the first treatment and recurrent cases more frequently had a higher HCV level at treatment termination compared to the pretreatment level. This suggests that the HCV virus either accelerates oncogenesis by direct interaction with B cells or indirectly affects lymphoma prognosis.