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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 215454, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/215454
Research Article

Clinically Significant Minor Blood Group Antigens amongst North Indian Donor Population

Department of Transfusion Medicine, Block D, Level II, Government Medical College & Hospital, Chandigarh 160030, India

Received 28 June 2013; Revised 23 October 2013; Accepted 27 October 2013

Academic Editor: Mark R. Litzow

Copyright © 2013 Divjot Singh Lamba et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. Racial differences in blood group antigen distribution are common and may result in striking and interesting findings. These differences in blood group antigen distribution are important due to their influence on the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. Study Design and Methods. This is a prospective study, involving 1000 healthy regular repeat voluntary blood donors associated with the department. The clinically significant minor blood group antigens of these donors were studied. Results. Out of 1000 healthy regular repeat voluntary blood donors, 93% were D positive and 2.8% were K positive. Amongst the Rh antigens, e was the most common (99%), followed by D (93%), C (85.1%), c (62.3%), and E (21.5%). Within the MNS blood group system, antigen frequency was M (88%), N (57.5%), S (57.8%), and s (87.5%). Within the Duffy blood group system, antigen frequency was (87.3%) and (58.3%). Conclusions. This data base will help us to prevent alloimmunisation in young females, pregnant women, and patients who are expected to require repeated transfusions in life by providing them with antigen matched blood. Antigen negative blood can also be made available without delay to already alloimmunized multitransfused patients.