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Advances in Hematology
Volume 2016, Article ID 3905907, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3905907
Review Article

Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

1Department of Haematology, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK
2Kings College London, Kings College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS, UK
3Department of Haematology, Guys and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK

Received 15 December 2015; Revised 28 March 2016; Accepted 4 April 2016

Academic Editor: Suparno Chakrabarti

Copyright © 2016 Kevon Parmesar and Kavita Raj. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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