Advances in Hematology

Crosstalk between Erythropoiesis and Iron Metabolism


Publishing date
01 Apr 2010
Status
Published
Submission deadline
01 Oct 2009

Lead Editor

1Department of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, Children's Cancer and Blood Foundation Laboratories, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY 10021, USA

2Departments of Medicine and Pathology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90005, USA

3Molecular Medicine Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA


Crosstalk between Erythropoiesis and Iron Metabolism

Description

Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis are closely intertwined. Erythroid precursors communicate their iron needs by modulating production of hepcidin. Under conditions of low iron absorption or altered iron metabolism, red cells production is severely impaired. In contrast, iron absorption is dramatically increased if red cell production is in high demand. In many unrelated conditions associated with inflammation and anemia, the role of several cytokines such as IL-6 and hepcidin is being recognized as the common denominator in perturbing iron metabolism and red cell production. In other disorders associated with ineffective erythropoiesis, such as beta-thalassemia and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs), low levels of hepcidin can increase iron absorption leading to production of nontransferrin iron bound (NTBI) and toxic organ iron overload. NTBI, in turn, can lead to increased concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) that might further impair erythropoiesis. However, thalassemia and MDS might exhibit diverse manifestations in iron overload, as indicated by specific organ damage and, potentially, requiring different treatments. The mechanism by which erythroid cells modulate iron absorption is still unclear though many recent discoveries in the field of iron metabolism rejuvenated this field. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play a major role in setting the baseline hepcidin level in collaboration with the hemochromatosis-related proteins hemojuvelin, HFE, transferrin receptor 2, and other transcriptional factors and proteases that control their synthesis or posttranslational activity, such as Smad 4, furin, or TMPRSS6. Under condition of ineffective erythropoiesis, hepcidin can be downmodulated factors secreted by erythroid cells named GDF-15 and TWSG1. In anemias, regulation of hepcidin might also be mediated by erythropoietin and hypoxia.

We invite authors to present original articles as well as review articles that will stimulate the continuing efforts in defining the role of proteins that control iron demand. We are particularly interested in those proteins that, while modulating iron metabolism, have a strong impact, directly or indirectly, on erythropoiesis. Basic research articles and reviews covering the subject of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism and manuscripts that describe the state of the art in the clinical care to prevent the damage due to altered iron absorption are welcomed.

Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • Erythropoiesis and iron metabolism
  • Hepcidin in disorders of iron and erythropoiesis
  • Inflammation, iron, and anemia
  • The labile iron pool, ROS, and erythropoiesis
  • Iron metabolism in disorders associate with altered erythropoiesis, such as beta-thalassemia, MDS, and polycythemia vera
  • Progress in iron chelation and management of hemoglobinopathies

Before submission authors should carefully read over the journal's Author Guidelines, which are located at http://www.hindawi.com/journals/ah/guidelines/. Prospective authors should submit an electronic copy of their complete manuscript through the journal Manuscript Tracking System at http://mts.hindawi.com/ according to the following timetable:


Articles

  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 317095
  • - Editorial

Crosstalk between Erythropoiesis and Iron Metabolism

Stefano Rivella | Elizabeta Nemeth | Jeffery Lynn Miller
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 404173
  • - Review Article

Ferroportin and Erythroid Cells: An Update

Luciano Cianetti | Marco Gabbianelli | Nadia Maria Sposi
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 756289
  • - Review Article

Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Emanuela Messa | Daniela Cilloni | Giuseppe Saglio
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 605435
  • - Review Article

Crosstalk between Iron Metabolism and Erythropoiesis

Huihui Li | Yelena Z. Ginzburg
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 938640
  • - Review Article

đť›˝ -Thalassemia: HiJAKing Ineffective Erythropoiesis and Iron Overload

Luca Melchiori | Sara Gardenghi | Stefano Rivella
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 272940
  • - Review Article

Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease

Radha Raghupathy | Deepa Manwani | Jane A. Little
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 358283
  • - Review Article

Iron Loading and Overloading due to Ineffective Erythropoiesis

Toshihiko Tanno | Jeffery L. Miller
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 790632
  • - Review Article

Diamond Blackfan Anemia at the Crossroad between Ribosome Biogenesis and Heme Metabolism

Deborah Chiabrando | Emanuela Tolosano
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 508739
  • - Review Article

Unexplained Aspects of Anemia of Inflammation

Elizabeth A. Price | Stanley L. Schrier
  • Special Issue
  • - Volume 2010
  • - Article ID 164045
  • - Case Report

Red Blood Cell Transfusion Independence Following the Initiation of Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Maha A. Badawi | Linda M. Vickars | ... | Heather A. Leitch
Advances in Hematology
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate8%
Submission to final decision77 days
Acceptance to publication25 days
CiteScore3.800
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